SF&E Pours Largest Nuclear Impeller in its History

We poured the largest impeller in the history of our company. Utilizing AOD ingot, we melted and cast 6,000 pounds of CA6NM martensitic stainless steel.

The reputation of Stainless Foundry & Engineering (SF&E) was built on being an industry leader in manufacturing all styles of impellers. Historically the Pump & Valve industry has had a great need for high quality Impellers, relying on us for high spec work like the one shared below.

SF&E specializes in:

  • Open Impellers
  • Multi Staged Impellers
  • Double Suction Impellers
  • Closed impellers

We work to exacting industry standards. Recently, we had a customer in dire need of a series of nuclear impellers commanding our biggest challenge yet. Not only that, but this all unfolded during the global COVID-19 pandemic and local Stay at Home order.

 

Successful Remote Follow-through with our Clients

 

This customer was originally scheduled to be on site for the majority of the process. The Stay at Home order may have prevented this from happening, but it did not delay our push to deliver this project on an expedited schedule. Positive and proactive measures were taken to communicate with the customer. We executed status conference calls every Tuesday and Thursday, on top of sharing various e-mails and photos detailing our progress on these first article castings.

 

Cutting Edge Lead Times at 11 Weeks

 

Even through extenuating circumstances, the entire process was a success. We cast, machined, and performed various non-destructive tests, including 120 radiographic exposures, on these large class 1 nuclear impellers to fulfill an 11 week lead time while maintaining a collaborative relationship with the customer.

 

 

 

Here for You

This is just one example of our commitment to our customers and our perseverance through the COVID-19 pandemic. We are committed to our customers and remain open to support other essential operations.

Stainless Foundry & Engineering, Inc. is here for you. No matter the challenge, we will help find a solution. Contact a team member today.

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